Contemporary Stone & Tile Design Magazine

Reflecting Lifestyle Trends in Kitchen & Bath Designs

April 1, 2009
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Photo Courtesy of The Apple Org.
Stone and tile continue to remain key components in kitchen and bathroom designs. For this private residence in Miami, FL, the design goal was to keep a natural theme consistent throughout the living spaces. The floor in the master bath features a taupe-colored shell stone tile, and the walls are clad floor to ceiling in 1- x 2-inch hand-cut glass mosaic tile. Designer: Interiors by Steven G, Pompano Beach, FL; Tile Manufacturer: Oceanside Glasstile, Carlsbad, CA; Tile Supplier: Innovative Surfaces


When designing the essential areas of a home, specifically kitchens and baths, designers and architects have been catering to the needs of those who occupy these spaces the most - the homeowners. And as trends continue to reflect lifestyle changes, kitchen and bathroom designs will reflect those styles, and stone and tile products remain the preferred materials to fulfill these latest requirements.

As for kitchens, the popularity of being a “weekend chef” has recently taken off, according to Shawn Graves of Interiors by Steven G in Pompano Beach, FL. “People are enjoying good food and wine at home and with friends,” he said. “Kitchen design is reflecting that. No longer is the kitchen detached and separated.”

To keep the kitchen part of the entire home, architects and designers will design the kitchen floor with stone and tile materials that can carry into other areas of the residence.

Photo Courtesy of The Apple Org.
In the kitchen of the Miami residence, the floor consists of 24- x 24-inch honed taupe-colored limestone tiles. For the countertops, a Smoky quartz from CaesarStone US was used, while a backsplash featuring 6- x 1-inch iridescent tile pieces in a basketweave pattern completes the look of the room. Stone Supplier: Keys Granite, Miami, FL (limestone); Tile Manufacturer: Oceanside Glasstile, Carlsbad, CA; Quartz Supplier: CaesarStone US, Van Nuys, CA, through Reyes Marble of Miami, FL

And when doing the actual entertaining, the right countertop selection can really give guests the most comfortable setting. Graves has particularly witnessed a trend in quartz countertops. “This is because of its strength and consistency,” he said.

Graves has also seen backsplashes becoming a prevalent part of kitchen design. “Backsplashes are key features in showing texture or slick surfaces that accent the overall design,” he explained.

Moving into bathroom designs, Graves is discovering that porcelain tile - which he considers to be a clean application material - has grown in popularity. In addition, floor-to-ceiling wall tile is becoming the norm. “This creates a very modern, European look,” he said. “Clean applications are being used because the material now comes in so many great unusual sizes and mosaic sheets. Minimal design is moving to the forefront here, mostly because of the Zen-spa thought process.”

A Zen-like retreat

Recently, Graves had the opportunity to create a Zen-like design for a private residence in Miami, FL, which included several bathrooms and a large contemporary kitchen. The space was created with the intention of making a comfortable living space using natural materials that would reflect the owner’s lifestyle.

Photo Courtesy of The Apple Org.
To maintain a cohesive look throughout the entire home, the limestone floor carries into other areas of the residence, including the dining room.

We really wanted to keep [the home] very organic and very simple,” explained the designer. “The project has one recurring theme, which was to work in repetition. We typically only brought in three types of materials - glass tile, stone and metal. Everything was kept pure and non-manmade.”

Graves remained true to that concept beginning in the master bathroom, which features 18- x 18-inch taupe, clay-colored shell stone floor tile. “This shows fossilized shells, and when you cut it, you get cross sections of sea animals,” he said, adding that the material was supplied by Keys Granite, Inc. of Miami, FL.

From floor to ceiling, every wall of this bathroom that has plumbing is clad in 1- x 2-inch hand-cut glass mosaic tile - manufactured by Oceanside Glasstile of Carlsbad, CA, and supplied by Innovative Surfaces - that went through a “favrille” application. “This is a French technique used in Tiffany glass to give it that opulent effect,” explained Graves. “It changes colors during the day, according to the light.”

When it came time to reconstruct a private residence in Houston, TX, natural materials were once again part of the design, which included a kitchen and two bathrooms. To add some variety and create contrast in the kitchen, two different types of stone were chosen for the countertops. While the main countertops are made from a Premium Black honed granite, 1 ¼-inch-think Calacatta marble was used for the island counters. Complementing the countertops are 24- x 24-inch Black Ash slate floor tiles. Architect: Mark Oberholzer, AIA; Designer: Four Square Design Studio, Houston, TX; Stone Suppliers: Walker Zanger, Houston, TX (Calacatta marble and Premium Black honed granite); Thorntree, Houston, TX (Black Ash slate)

To offset the shower - which is also clad in the same glass mosaic tile - the designer and his team inset it with a border made out of small river stone in a “vine” iridescent pattern. “The border was lined with a hand-forged glass,” he said. “Everything was very detailed, touched by hand, not a machine.”

A further feature of the shower is its limestone floor, comprised of 12- x 12-inch tiles, which are each grooved. This was done since the shower is an open application, according to Graves. “Instead of having a glass box, it’s an open shower room,” he said. “The floor very slightly slopes into the drain, and since each stone piece is grooved, that helps with all of the water drainage.”

Keeping the Zen-like atmosphere in mind, the kitchen also was given a clean, chic look. “Every room relates to the next,” said Graves. “You don’t feel like you’re in a complete different setting when you turn the corner.”

The Premium Black honed granite is built up 1 ½ inches for the edges, while the Calacatta marble has a 1 ¼-inch thickness. “Although the black honed counters are built up to 1 ½ inches, we were pleased to be able to get 2 cm stone for the Calacatta island counter,” said Laura Michaelides of Four Square Design Studio. “Since Calacatta has veining, we were able to get a nicer installation without seams for this application.”

The kitchen floor is comprised of 24- x 24-inch honed taupe-colored limestone tiles, which were also supplied by Keys Granite, Inc. Moreover, the same material also extends into other main areas of the home. “This stone has a beautiful movement to it,” said Graves. “It almost looks like a sandstone - it’s toned like a putty color, but there’s no yellow in it.”

For the countertops, the design team selected a Smoky quartz, which was supplied by CaesarStone US of Van Nuys, CA, through Reyes Marble of Miami, FL. “We chose quartz for its function, resilience and consistency,” said Graves. “The seams are almost non-existent.”

Complementing the quartz countertops, Graves took a different approach for the kitchen backsplash. “We really brought in the unexpected,” he said. “For the backsplash, we hand set, piece by piece, iridescent tile that looks like a basketweave. Each 6- x 1-inch piece is laid piece by piece, like brick.”

Drawings for the project began in November 2006, and construction was complete in February 2008. “The client was, and is, one of our most special clients,” said Graves. “They have complete 100% faith in us. They really let us come up with a concept. As for selection and color, they were questioning on the direction because when laying the material on a table, it really didn’t come off as polished, crisp and modern. At the end of the install, they were shaking our hands. Here we are in Miami, on the ocean, doing very earthy colors - nothing vibrant. It was a stretch, but it really worked.”

In the master bathroom, Michaelides chose 12- x 12-inch Alhambra limestone tiles for most of the floor and wall areas and Capri limestone for the vanity top. Stone Supplier: Walker Zanger, Houston, TX

An extensive stone palette

A variety of different stone and tile products were also used to complete several rooms - including a kitchen and two bathrooms - for a private residence in Houston, TX. Much thought went into the material selection in each of these areas, according to Laura Michaelides of Four Square Design Studio in Houston, TX, which served as the designer for this project.

“We looked for a long time at lots of different materials, and we purchased from a number of different resources,” she said. “The materials that were selected help to express the clean modern aesthetics of the house.”

On the first floor, the kitchen is the most important area where natural stone and tile is used, according to Michaelides. To add some variety and create contrast, two different types of stone were chosen for the countertops. While the main countertops are made from a Premium Black honed granite, 1¼-inch-thick Calacatta marble is used for the island counter and the backsplash. Both materials were supplied by Walker Zanger’s Houston, TX, location.

In the master bathroom, the Alhambra limestone tiles carry onto the shower walls as well as the shower floor, but in a 3- x 3-inch format. Additionally, an accent wall features 3- x 3-inch “Wax Paper” glass tile. Stone Supplier: Walker Zanger, Houston, TX (Alhambra limestone); Tile Supplier: Ann Sacks (“Wax Paper” glass tile)

“Although the black honed counters are built up to 1 ½ inches, we were pleased to be able to get 2 cm stone for the Calacatta island counter,” said Michaelides. “Since Calacatta has veining, we were able to get a nicer installation without seams for this application.”

For the kitchen floors, the designer went with 24- x 24-inch Black Ash slate tiles from Thorntree International of Houston, TX. “This continues into the hallways and dining areas to give a continuous feel,” she said.

In the pool bathroom, which is also on the first floor, stone and tile make up what Michaelides describes as a “colorful space.” The bathroom floor consists of 12- x 12-inch Buchtal tiles from Knoxtile of Dallas, TX.

For the shower in the pool bathroom, the designer took that a step further. “We used a fairly complicated scheme in this space,” she explained. An accent wall - featuring “Spa Fountain” blend, which is a 1- x 1-inch glass tile mixture from Walker Zanger - is the main focus inside the shower. The remaining shower walls are clad in 6- x 6-inch Royal Mosa tile from Knoxtile, while 2- x 2-inch white porcelain tiles from Daltile, make up the shower floor.

In the pool bathroom, which is also on the first floor, stone and tile make up what Michaelides describes as a “colorful space.” The bathroom floor consists of 12- x 12-inch Buchtal tiles from Knoxtile of Dallas, TX. An accent wall featuring a “Spa Fountain” blend of 1- x 1-inch accent tile from Walker Zanger is the main focus inside the shower. The remaining shower walls are clad in 6- x 6-inch Royal Mosa tile from Knoxtile, while 2- x 2-inch white porcelain tiles from Daltile of Dallas, TX, make up the shower floor. Tile Supplier: Daltile, Dallas, TX (white porcelain); Knoxtile, Dallas, TX (Buchtal tile and Royal Mosa tile); Walker Zanger, Houston, TX (Spa Fountain blend)

Moving up to the second floor, the designer again made several stone and tile choices for the master bathroom. “On the floor and on the walls for most of this bathroom, we used 12- x 12-inch Alhambra limestone tiles from Walker Zanger,” she said, adding that the same tiles carried onto the shower walls. “We also used the same material for the shower floor, but had the material cut to a 3- x 3-inch size. The countertop is a stone called Capri limestone, and then we did an accent wall in a 3- x 3-inch ‘Wax Paper’ glass tile from Ann Sacks.”

In total, the house measures 7,600 square feet. The house was designed by architect Mark Oberholzer, AIA, with all interiors done by Michaelides. “We did the whole house from the ground up,” said the designer. “It began as an addition, but the original house ended up being torn down, and we ended up designing an entirely new house.”

Photo by Shadow Catcher, Ltd.
The bathroom of a private residence in Kingston, PA, was renovated to fit the needs of the client’s current lifestyle. “[The client] has a love for gadgets and natural materials,” said Carl Handman, AIA, of Eyerman.Csala.Hapeman and Handman Architects. The stone of choice throughout the bathroom is an Unfading Green slate, while a glass mosaic tile was selected to complement the slate’s coloring. Architect: Eyerman.Csala.Hapeman and Handman Architects, Wilkes-Barre, PA; Interior Designer: Janet Flack Interiors; Installer: Bob Pugliese; Stone Supplier: Sheldon Slate Products, Middle Granville, NY; Tile Supplier: Porcelanosa

The finished project was submitted for a design competition put together by the Decorative Center of Houston and Paper City - a local Houston magazine. It tied for First Prize in the Residential Division.

Revamping with slate

The main objective in renovating a bathroom for a private residence in Kingston, PA, was to fit the needs of the client’s current lifestyle. “[The client] has a love for gadgets and natural materials,” said Carl J. Handman, AIA, of Eyerman.Csala.Hapeman & Handman Architects in Wilkes-Barre, PA, who served as the architect for the project. The stone of choice throughout the bathroom is an Unfading Green slate from Vermont, while a glass mosaic tile was selected to complement the slate’s coloring.

Although the bathroom resides in a 1925 residence, and historic preservation happens to be part of Handman’s practice, the architect explained that this was not the case for the project. “[The bathroom] had been not kindly treated by the various previous owners,” he said. “There really wasn’t much historic material to work with.”

Photo by Shadow Catcher, Ltd.
Unfading Green slate with a glass mosaic accent stripe is featured throughout the walls of the bathroom, including the shower walls.

The bathroom sits above the home’s foyer ceiling, so Handman chose to have the plumbing fixtures remain in the same location. “We didn’t want to do damage to the foyer below,” he said “The sink and the toilet are in the same place, while a shower replaced the original tub; it was only shifted over a foot to have a TV area to its right. Additionally, we robbed an adjacent closet where the steam unit is now located.”

When it came time to the material selection for the renovation, Handman explained that he has a preference for slate materials, and that the client also wanted to use natural products. “After having shown the client different samples, he was drawn to the Vermont green slate.

“There were no other stone materials considered other than slate,” he continued. “The owner liked the natural cleft finish for the tiles.”

Vermont Unfading Green slate in a natural cleft finish - supplied by Sheldon Slate Products of Middle Granville, NY - was employed for the bathroom floor and wainscot of the walls. “The floor is set in a 6- x 6-inch diamond pattern,” said Handman. “The walls are a wainscot of the same slate going up 4 feet with a custom-made bullnose.”

Photo by Shadow Catcher, Ltd.
The same Unfading Green slate is carried onto the vanity tops, but was given a smooth matte finish.

Additionally, the same material forms the countertops, but in a smooth matte finish. The matching slate also replaced two threshold doors.

Glass tile from Porcelanosa is also incorporated into the design. “Once we had selected the slate, the interior designer wanted to introduce a contrast by using glass tile which picks up the greenish-grayish highlights,” said the architect.

A 6-inch wide accent stripe made of 1- x 1-inch glass tile moves across the walls of the bathroom. Additionally, it serves as the back surface for “cubby holes” in the shower to create a place for accruements, according to Handman. “This gives an illusion of depth since it’s only a 97-square-foot renovation,” he explained, adding that the opposite wall is mirrored to expand the space visually. “It really doubles the size.”

According to Handman, the biggest challenge came in minimizing disturbance to the house. “The tile had previously been mudset, so we had to replace it,” he said. “Getting everything to work properly was a challenge, but we had an excellent tile setter. It was a real pleasure to have him on the job. He used a leveling compound and an anti-fracture membrane mat to make sure we had no cracking going through.”

Handman explained that the owner is very pleased with the finished project. “He loves his gadgets with the natural materials featured throughout,” he said.

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